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Showing content with the highest reputation on 06/15/2022 in all areas

  1. Cone flex can be a problem but only in drivers not designed adequately for high pressure applications. It has not been a problem with any of the cab designs I've made/tested/used with 18" or larger drivers. There is a reason that modern high power sub drivers have a heavy mms and stiff suspensions. It is required for strength, control and power handling. The cone on a larger diameter driver must be stronger / thicker than a smaller diameter unit, the voice coils are massive to handle large power inputs, the suspensions are stiffer and heavier to keep things centered and prevent overshoot, fight against gravity over time, etc. Most pro audio and car audio subs are built to take a lot of abuse. This is why a pro audio 15" woofer might have a MMS of 80g but a true subwoofer might have an mms >250g. Even though the 2 might have a similar FS and Xmax rating or even power handling, they are still suited to different jobs. The 80g 15" woofer is not going to fare as well in a FLH or other high output high pressure loading.
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  2. By "lack of cone control", do you mean non linearity in the translation from electrical to kinetic energy or do you mean cone flex? The former can be remedied by a stronger motor, the latter through a stiffer cone. Both problems are challenges to the designer, not to the end user. Any properly designed driver will play predictably based on the Klippel graphs. For B&C drivers I think it's the Xvar value, which is a general rule of thumb for when the driver behaviour will transition into non-linear territory. If this was a huge issue, big drivers wouldn't be so popular.
    1 point
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