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Ricci

Xarion Laser Acoustics

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I'm just going to leave this here.

Xarion.com

I actually discovered this at work from a colleague believe it or not. We have components that are used in their products.

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Oooh!  I probably can't afford that.  Also, if I'm reading the specs right, it doesn't do well with "low level" signals, but it's hard to tell.  The specs in the data sheets seem to contradict the specs on the web pages.

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I do not know how much these are. I just found out about this product on Monday. I expect it is many thousands of USD or EU. The 250 model specs a dynamic range of 50-150dB and a low noise floor. Might be useful for typical 65-130dB acoustic measurements.

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9 hours ago, Ricci said:

I do not know how much these are. I just found out about this product on Monday. I expect it is many thousands of USD or EU. The 250 model specs a dynamic range of 50-150dB and a low noise floor. Might be useful for typical 65-130dB acoustic measurements.

The data sheet just gives "100 dB".  I'm not sure what to believe.

I doubt I could afford it, but I could some day use a mic that's omni up to 20 kHz.  That would give me more accurate in-room measurements of those highest of frequencies.

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I might inquire into the cost of one of these kits. Couldn't hurt to find out. What I like about this is the ability to handle extremely high pressures without any problem and the extremely small size. It would be useful for investigating inside of horns or bandpass cabs or other very close proximity high spl situations. I also like the idea that there are no moving parts, or diaphragm that reacts to physical forces with the associated resonances, etc. It removes one more source of potential variation from the signal chain.

One thing that may be of concern is the laser head. This likely uses a small solid state laser so it could be engineered to last a good long while, or it may only last a few hundred hours. Depending on use you could be replacing the diode, or laser assembly once in 10 years or every year. Also lasers do not do well with shock, rapid temperature changes and humidity usually. That could be a concern. I'm speculating. They may have developed it around a very low cost, robust laser assembly.  

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Awesome tech!

 

The changes in wavelength of light / refractive index of air must surely be vanishingly small!

 

Pretty amazing stuff - us humans are pretty clever :) It's a shame we mostly seem to use it designing things to kill each other... :rolleyes: 

 

Looks like it's only specced down to 10Hz, though - @Bossobass Dave won't be impressed :D lol

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Lots of things are spec'd to 10 or 20Hz but work pretty well lower than that. Hopefully this is one of those cases.

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1 hour ago, Ricci said:

Lots of things are spec'd to 10 or 20Hz but work pretty well lower than that. Hopefully this is one of those cases.

I did a bit more reading about their tech.  AFAICT, the transducer itself is both extremely linear across a very wide bandwidth and has an exceedingly low noise floor.  They report being able to discern as precisely as 1 uPa, which is -10 dB SPL.

I suspect then that attributes such as the low frequency limit and noise floor will depend entirely on the electronics.  With max SPL capability being 180 dB SPL, the electronics probably must be optimized for either very high or very low SPL and not both.  It's not clear from the specs which way this goes.  It's possible that the instruments can be customized to the application, which means it may be possible to customize for less bottom-end roll-off too.

Of course, these things are likely very expensive.  As a wild guess, I'd put the price somewhere in the 5 figures, at least.  That's too bad.  My Umik has about 6 dB response difference between 0 and 90 degrees by 20 kHz.  More expensive mics like from Earthworks aren't really any better.  The size of the microphone is very significant relative to those tiny wavelengths.  Even at, say, 4 kHz the difference is 1 dB for the Umik.

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