Jump to content

Leaderboard


Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 10/06/2019 in all areas

  1. 3 points
    I see it's been about two years since my last update. My hardware configuration hasn't really changed in that time. I still have all the drivers I was going to use to build new MBMs, but I'm now not even sure I need them. Building them is a very low priority, and the amp I bought to power them is likely to get used to power my "demo" speaker system instead. OTOH, the DSP configuration has been modified heavily. In other threads here, I've hinted about my discovery of a novel method for optimizing low frequencies. I've made substantial progress on this and also on optimizing high frequencies, which seemed to benefit from more attention after I'd managed to drastically reduce the muddying effect of low frequency problems. Lately, my attention has returned to low frequencies, this time dealing with sensitivity to physical /environmental changes such as the precise location of MBMs and absorber panels vs. where they were when I measured. Just this week, I finally implemented the first algorithmically optimized low frequency configuration. I expected some improvement below 40 Hz, but was amazed by how much the increase in precision provided by computer vs. hand optimization improved the sound from the mid-range on down to the very bottom. I watched some of the scenes from "Ready: Player One" using the @maxmercy BEQ. It's hard to describe the experience. Despite pushing into the 120s dB, the bass never trampled the mids and highs, which came through clearly even on the weightiest of sound effects, yet the bass itself contributed intense physicality to some of the sounds. The slam was impressive, not just because it was there but because it was *everywhere* and in a wide variety of different flavors rather than being a one-note-ish thump as is often the case with PA systems. I also didn't notice any house shaking at all, but I don't know if this will be the case with other movies. As a kind of ironic conclusion to this thread, I figured out that I didn't need 4 MBMs with independent DSP to get "perfect bass response" at all my seats, yet the title seems to be a reasonable description of what I experience now with my optimized configuration. What I mean is that the bass almost feels like it's coming from inside my own body, and this sensation follows me around the room, even when I'm well outside the "calibrated" listening area. This is similar to experiences I've had with superb quality bass systems outdoors, but I'm experiencing this indoors throughout a room that's not especially large nor heavily outfitted with absorption. The low frequency sound in general seems to be completely untainted by the room, and the acoustics of the recordings (whether natural or synthetic) come through with remarkable clarity. Unlike those outdoor systems, I am able to take full advantage of room gain and hit high SPL down to much lower frequencies. Part of the reason I became so quiet about my recent work on my system is that I am seriously thinking about seeking commercial application for my technology. My confidence in this regard has been growing over the last year or so. I'm now fairly confident (i.e. > 50% chance) that I will go into business, in some form or another, with this technology. I haven't worked out the details yet, but I have some ideas. I'm likely to start small with custom / bespoke installs. These could be for ultra high-end home theater or perhaps for mixing / mastering rooms. These early jobs could fund further research into adapting my methods (or developing new ones, where necessary) for cars as well as potentially larger rooms (cinemas?) and outdoor environments. Admittedly, I'm shying away from doing any kind of consumer product because I don't know if I will be able to make my tech work reliably under those circumstances. I don't know if I can really make it "idiot proof" enough, but I can potentially research that too. So with that said, I'll try not to self-advertise too much in these threads. Thus far, I haven't really meant to. I'm just passionate about this subject and am having a very hard time "keeping this great sound to myself". Maybe I should just record my system and post it on YouTube? () Seriously though, from a marketing standpoint I've already lost. Just about everything positive I'd like to claim about my own sound has already been claimed repeatedly for other products that, IMO, don't live up to the hype. So perhaps my best approach is just not to *say* anything and let my systems "speak" for me. That probably means starting small and growing very slowly, which isn't necessarily bad.
  2. 2 points
    Finished a Skram a couple of weeks ago and I love the sound. My wife even commented on how smooth it sounded. Completely outran my tops. I originally put a driver from zxpc in it since the LaVoce was out of stock. Pretty ugly. Anyway got the LaVoce in and this is what I measured quick and dirty. No reference as to SPL - I used the USB OmniMic but I was running a signal flat from computer to mixer to xover. I think I lowpassed it at 200hz; high pass was off. Actually, not sure where I lowpassed it... somewhere above 100 hz. Also, I'm between jobs and would love to sell this to someone. Guess I should post it in the for sale section.
  3. 1 point
    Thanks for the good advices! I´ll be back with some testing results of the materials and maybe we try some cooling systems (not sure yet)
  4. 1 point
    Mines are almost ready as well, just have to put one more varnish coat, put the driver (21DS115-4) in and measure them ! Will post everything there as soon as I'll have the time to setup everything and when the weather will get better here.
  5. 1 point
    So, Im finally going to start building my SKrams.... my new room is finished and getting all the sub stuff buttoned up. I have all the pieces CNC'd. Is there a good order to put it together?
×
×
  • Create New...