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Showing content with the highest reputation on 10/01/2019 in all areas

  1. 1 point
    I often hear sound guys talk of too much stage volume from the band members especially drummers, but it's not as simple as just play quieter like it would seem to be. It can fundamentally affect the entire feel of the composition for the drummer, the entire band and even the audience since the group now has less energy, especially in the smaller intimate venues where this type of problem usually occurs. Basically you are asking the drummer to tone it down, and not put nearly as much energy and dynamics into the performance as usual. Usually there's a reason these drummers play like this. I'm one BTW...Usually drummers that are really loud are used to playing with little to no PA reinforcement (perhaps just kick if even that) and having to provide the beat with acoustic drums only while competing against amplified instruments. If you think about it there is probably no other instrument that you would literally ask the person to alter their usual playing style and performance in such a big way. I guess you could go to an all electric kit with triggers but that carries a host of other trade offs. In the smaller clubs or bars with live musicians the "PA" often isn't really needed a whole lot for overall volume, but mostly for vocals, samples and other instruments which need a boost in volume. In large clubs and especially arenas there is often enough distance and dispersion to work around loud players and the PA does a whole lot more work in these situations. Anyway that's a subject I'm very familiar with.
  2. 1 point
    120db was unweighted or dbC. You wouldn't enjoy a concert at 120dbA. When I mix shows outdoors or indoors in a venue with a capacity of say 500 and up I like to keep the dbA average at 100, because that's where it 'excites' you but it still doesn't hurt. That also happens to be the European standard and limit/goal for Rock concerts usually. When observing the db meter I noticed that some crowds (cheering of 1000 people and more) easily exceeded 100dbA. When mixing shows in smaller clubs you'll notice that the un-mic'd drumkit already exceeds 100dbA and you're left hoping for the drummer to accept your request for playing quieter or you can't really mix. Legally, you'd have to end the gig halfway through, because the band was 'using up' their loudness units too quickly. I've got two smaller shows in Austria next month, I'll have a look what dbZ I'm usually reaching, but my guess it that it's gonna be around 115db-120db while the kick drum is playing.
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