Jump to content


Photo

Help Choosing The Right Sub To Build


  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 deacea87

deacea87

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts

Posted 11 March 2017 - 07:09 PM

I'd like to build 2 Subs for home theater playback. I want to get down to 15 Hz. The space area is 1000sq to fill. I was thinking of 2 Lowarhorn builds, but I'm a novice to bass and was wondering, for the cost of 2 Lowarhorn or G-horn builds, could I reach the same output level using more drivers and a different design? Power for me is not a concern, I have 4 high power amps. Space is not at a problem, however I wouldn't be opposed to a smaller design. Any suggestions?



#2 lukeamdman

lukeamdman

    Bass Overlord

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 835 posts
  • LocationBurnsville, MN

Posted 12 March 2017 - 01:09 AM

I'd like to build 2 Subs for home theater playback. I want to get down to 15 Hz. The space area is 1000sq to fill. I was thinking of 2 Lowarhorn builds, but I'm a novice to bass and was wondering, for the cost of 2 Lowarhorn or G-horn builds, could I reach the same output level using more drivers and a different design? Power for me is not a concern, I have 4 high power amps. Space is not at a problem, however I wouldn't be opposed to a smaller design. Any suggestions?

 

What about some large ported subs tuned to 15-17hz?  There are plenty of good and cheap 18" drivers out there to choose from as well.  



#3 MemX

MemX

    Bass Overlord

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 538 posts

Posted 13 March 2017 - 11:49 AM

What budget are you looking at?

 

What amps do you already have?



#4 Ricci

Ricci

    Super Bass Overlord

  • Moderators
  • 1,105 posts
  • LocationLouisville, KY

Posted 13 March 2017 - 01:12 PM

What budget are you looking at?

 

What amps do you already have?

 

This...Budget is a major detail. Also what are your listening habits? Mostly HT or mostly music? 50/50? Playback levels required?



#5 deacea87

deacea87

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts

Posted 18 March 2017 - 01:40 PM

I have (3) 6000 Inukes on standby. Playback will be mostly be HT. The I have up to $2500 to play with. 



#6 MemX

MemX

    Bass Overlord

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 538 posts

Posted 24 March 2017 - 12:53 PM

Hmmm...  the iNuke6000 can't be bridge, can it?  That's a pain - it means you either have to run one channel per voice coil on a dual voice coil (DVC) sub (which I'd personally be loathe to do, just in case the channels aren't perfectly balanced) or run a sub off each channel and have more subs that are lower powered.

 

I was going to suggest you look at the Stereo Integrity 24" because they are by all accounts excellent at shifting a lot of air while also sounding high quality, but IIRC they are DVC.

 

Perhaps you should consider six 18" drivers, one off each channel of the iNuke amps, in dual opposed boxes to cancel out box movement?



#7 dgage

dgage

    Super Power Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 204 posts

Posted 25 March 2017 - 06:28 AM

Perhaps you should consider six 18" drivers, one off each channel of the iNuke amps, in dual opposed boxes to cancel out box movement?


The only advantage I see to dual-opposed boxes is the vibration cancelation but I don't think that makes up for their shortcomings. Before mentioning the shortcomings, I haven't noticed any vibration issues with any of the well-built single 18s on the market. Here are the things I don't like about dual-opposed:
* larger box size
* lack of flexibility in placement
* phase/coherence issues if facing one side into a wall
* external noise on other side of wall if sub is facing wall
Add those up and I don't know why dual-opposed is as popular as it is or at least was.

Then again, one sub system I really liked with dual-opposed boxes was BeastAudio's setup with his 4 dual-opposed SI HT18 subs placed at 45-degree angles to the front and left/right walls, upper and lower. Then again, he was fortunate to have the large but square Danley SH50s at the time, which allowed that unique and optimal placement. With his JBLs he has now, that placement doesn't work anymore.

David Gage
Deep Sea Sound
"You don't listen to our subs, you EXPERIENCE them!"


#8 shadyJ

shadyJ

    Power Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 91 posts

Posted 25 March 2017 - 04:37 PM

The only advantage I see to dual-opposed boxes is the vibration cancelation but I don't think that makes up for their shortcomings. Before mentioning the shortcomings, I haven't noticed any vibration issues with any of the well-built single 18s on the market. Here are the things I don't like about dual-opposed:
* larger box size
* lack of flexibility in placement
* phase/coherence issues if facing one side into a wall
* external noise on other side of wall if sub is facing wall
Add those up and I don't know why dual-opposed is as popular as it is or at least was.

Then again, one sub system I really liked with dual-opposed boxes was BeastAudio's setup with his 4 dual-opposed SI HT18 subs placed at 45-degree angles to the front and left/right walls, upper and lower. Then again, he was fortunate to have the large but square Danley SH50s at the time, which allowed that unique and optimal placement. With his JBLs he has now, that placement doesn't work anymore.

I largely agree with these points. In favor of a dual opposed box, it can cost a bit less than having the same arrangement in two separate boxes. However, that doesn't outweigh the cons you listed. I don't think phase issues are a serious disadvantage with dual opposed though, however, obviously you do have more control with how the room handles the frequency response with separate enclosures, and that far outweighs the advantages of dual opposed when everything else is equal. Another point I want to make is that dual opposed does not eliminate cabinet vibration- it cancels out cabinet rocking motion. If anything, dual opposed would make panel vibrations worse, but it doesn't take a lot of internal bracing to make panel vibrations a non-issue in subwoofers.

 

For the home theater oriented subs, I think dual opposed gets some attention from those who just think bigger is better and just want a big sub, period. For the hi-fi market, those manufacturers are banking on the "vibration cancellation" aspect of dual opposed, and are also trying to get as much output out of a small enclosure as possible. Bowers and Wilkins have just gone this route and have recently announced three new dual opposed subs at their high-end. IF the drivers are light and powerful enough to deal with a small enclosure size, than I think dual opposed makes sense, for those who can only have small cabinets but still want some output. One dual opposed subs that I think makes sense is Funk's 18.2 subs, but they have a light driver that is powerful enough that it can handle a small space without being badly compromised. 






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users