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How strong can a magnetic field be before you get hurt or die?


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#1 Kyle

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Posted 22 February 2017 - 07:36 PM

Not exactly on topic but I thought this was a cool read and is at least, in the spirit of science

 

https://gravityandle...be-to-kill-you/

 

 

Speakers typically have about 0;5 to 1T in the gap so a field of 100,000T would be insane! Neutron starts do have these types of fields and I would imagine one would be pulverized if you got near one in more than one way. The Hadron Collider (from what I have read) only gets the field up to about 8 or 9Tesla... still nothing approaching atomic distortion levels :)

 

 

quick and dirty calculation: If you're speaker produce 90dB at 1 watt with a 1T in the gap then if you increased that to 100,000T

 

log base 2 of (100k) is about ~16.

16*6dB = 96dB (rough dB conversion)

 

90+96 = 186dB @ 1 watt...

 

...You would tear the the cone right off the spider and surround with just 1 watt :)

in fact it might become a weapon or projectile of sorts, haha


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#2 Infrasonic

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Posted 22 February 2017 - 07:45 PM


 

...You would tear the the cone right off the spider and surround with just 1 watt :)

in fact it might become a weapon or projectile of sorts, haha

 

Excellent. :D



#3 Kyle

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Posted 22 February 2017 - 09:36 PM

Now that I think about it, this type of motor might be able to push the cone faster than the speed of sound and create a pulsing series of shockwaves at low frequencies. That would be fun to see!



#4 Ricci

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Posted 22 February 2017 - 10:16 PM

Ok...So how do we start crowd funding this?



#5 Kyle

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Posted 22 February 2017 - 11:59 PM

Neutron motor does have an intimidating sound to it :)

 

steps 1 and 2: We need to start with a star and then make it go supernova

 

I'm stuck on steps 1 and 2 :(



#6 shadyJ

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Posted 23 February 2017 - 03:04 AM

If you can put a ring of conductive and non-ferrous material around a magnetar, with a massive way to charge it, you are on to something. Maybe use a pulsar somehow to charge it? The problem is you need a medium to put it in to conduct sound. Anyway, there are already ready-made cosmic subwoofers that are very powerful which use black hole motors.



#7 Infrasonic

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Posted 23 February 2017 - 05:10 AM



Neutron motor does have an intimidating sound to it :)

 

steps 1 and 2: We need to start with a star and then make it go supernova

 

I'm stuck on steps 1 and 2 :(

 

Step 3: Step back, way back

 

giphy.gif

 

tumblr_lyw2m7RNMd1qzguyto3_r1_250.gif


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#8 SME

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Posted 23 February 2017 - 05:46 AM

Most of the strongest usable electromagnets rely the phenomenon of superconduction.  A superconductor is a material with effectively zero electrical resistance.  Superconductors typically require operation at cryogenic temperatures and are limited with respect to maximum current and magnetic field or else the superconduction is lost.

 

Here is a claim to the highest human made magnetic field at 91.4 Tesla ( Oddly enough, they did not use a superconducting coil.  However, the field lasts for less than 0.02 seconds to not damage the coil.

 

In terms of how strong a magnetic field must be to be unhealthy, I don't know if there is a good answer to that question.  The strongest MRI scanners subject the human body to 3 Tesla.  I'm not aware of any negative side effects of that kind of exposure.



#9 Kyle

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Posted 23 February 2017 - 11:06 PM

91T is insane. Image an electric car motor made with those magnets.



#10 BeastAudio

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Posted 21 March 2017 - 08:28 PM

The fact that this is even a discussable subject in THIS forum made me laugh. Yay for magnets.

 

I wonder what magnetic force the rail gun uses:

 



#11 Ricci

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Posted 22 March 2017 - 01:31 PM

91T is insane. Image an electric car motor made with those magnets.

 

90 Tesla might be a bit much but what if we lower the goals a bit? Say 5T through the gap? Design us a 5T sub motor Kyle!



#12 Kyle

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Posted 23 March 2017 - 05:51 PM

Going to be very hard as any material common in driver motors wouldn't work. Steel is insufficient as a conduit for the flux that strong. Neo magnets can't reach that high either

 

https://en.wikipedia...tion_(magnetic)

 

 

we need unobtainium 



#13 shadyJ

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Posted 23 March 2017 - 07:25 PM

What about a field coil type driver? Could charged copper coils have a more powerful field than conventional permanent magnets?



#14 SME

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Posted 23 March 2017 - 08:14 PM

What about a field coil type driver? Could charged copper coils have a more powerful field than conventional permanent magnets?

 

Sure.  Build a superconducting electromagnet, and you can definitely get more magnetic field strength than from a permanent magnet.  While it's superconducting, the magnet coil itself will consume very little power, but of course you need a way to cool that coil to cryogenic temperatures, at which point the exercise begins to look pretty ridiculous.


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#15 shadyJ

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Posted 23 March 2017 - 10:58 PM

Sure.  Build a superconducting electromagnet, and you can definitely get more magnetic field strength than from a permanent magnet.  While it's superconducting, the magnet coil itself will consume very little power, but of course you need a way to cool that coil to cryogenic temperatures, at which point the exercise begins to look pretty ridiculous.

Nothing is ridiculous when it's in the name of SCIENCE!






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